racism


Post-World War II Eugenics

by John Cavanaugh-O’Keefe Editor’s note: this is an excerpt from the book The Roots of Racism and Abortion: An Exploration of Eugenics, pp. 114-116. The dominant figure in American eugenics after World War II was a complex individual, Frederick Osborn (1889-1981). He is credited with reforming eugenics, removing the taint of racism and putting the…


Valentine Friends: Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass

by Carol Crossed These were remarks delivered by Carol Crossed at a February 18, 2018 event at the Susan B. Anthony Birthplace Museum, a CLN member group.   This week is not only the birthday of Susan B. Anthony, but also the 200th birthday of her good friend Frederick Douglass. Because of illiteracy, the birth…


“Is It Too Late?” 1971 Speech of Fannie Lou Hamer

In honor of Black History Month, we offer a speech by civil rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer (1917-1977).     Fannie Lou Hamer was a leading civil rights activist in the 1960s and 1970s. Among her many accomplishments was co-founding the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, which challenged the right of the all-white segregationist Democratic Party…


The Jukes and Kallikaks “Studies”

by John Cavanaugh-O’Keefe Editor’s note: this is an excerpt from the book The Roots of Racism and Abortion: An Exploration of Eugenics, pp. 52-54 In 1877, Richard Dugdale published a study of a family whom he called the “Jukes” family. He referred to a mother several generations back in the family as “Margaret, the mother…


The Frustrations of Being a Consistent Life Activist

by Lisa Stiller   I recently attended a rally in support of the people in Charlottesville, Virginia. The previous Saturday a “Unite the Right” rally protesting the removal of statues of Confederate figures had erupted into violence, as one participant plowed his car into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing one and injuring many. Many Confederate…


More than Double the Trouble: Another Way of Connecting

by Rachel MacNair An important idea for understanding how social injustice works is making the rounds. It’s called “intersectionality,” and it’s a specialized way of connecting issues. That makes it right up our alley. Many good examples of intersectionality  have been offered, but those of us familiar with the consistent life ethic can offer some…


Historical Black Voices: Racism Kills

February is Black History Month, celebrated in the U.S. and Canada (and in Great Britain in October); it’s commonly also called African American History Month in the U.S.  In the US, the virulence of racism leads to a disproportionate impact on African Americans of the forms of  lethal violence: more likely to be targeted for…


A New Pro-Life Movement

by Shane Claiborne Note: Shane Claiborne founded The Simple Way in Philadelphia and heads up Red Letter Christians (people who are committed to living “as if Jesus meant the things he said.”) His books include The Irresistible Revolution and Executing Grace: How the Death Penalty Killed Jesus and Why it’s Killing Us.     We…


A Tale of Two Cruises

by Rachel MacNair   The National Review is a magazine founded by William F. Buckley in 1955 to give intellectual heft to conservatism. The Nation is a magazine that was founded in 1865 as a successor to William Lloyd Garrison’s The Liberator and it offers progressive thought. Each of them regards the other as being…


Our Experience with Overturning Terrible Court Decisions

by Rachel MacNair Several US Supreme Court decisions have been horrifying. What lessons can we learn from history? Dred Scott v. Sandford, 1857 Dred Scott was an enslaved man who petitioned the Court for his freedom and that of his wife and their two daughters, because they had been moved to a state without slavery….