war policy


Abort or Face Discharge

by Sarah Terzo A book published in 2010 revealed that the military had a policy that all servicewomen who became pregnant had to abort or face discharge – and this policy was in place before Roe vs. Wade, when abortion was still illegal throughout the United States. The U.S. military’s purpose is to wage war….


The Civil War Conundrum, 150 Years Later

by Rachel MacNair My great-grandfather was born a Quaker, but when he married my great-grandmother, he converted to being Methodist for her sake. His parents were Quakers, and once I took an interest in genealogy, I found that, through them I had Quaker ancestors (that is, members of the Religious Society of Friends) going all…


The Biden Administration and Russia: Steps to Build a More Stable Relationship

by John Whitehead Among the many challenges Joseph Biden will face as the new president of the United States is how to handle the American relationship with Russia. US-Russian relations have now deteriorated to a level of mutual hostility comparable to that during the Cold War. Hostility between nations is always a serious concern for…


Sickness is the Health of the State? Civil Liberties and Conflict during a Pandemic

by John Whitehead The COVID-19 pandemic has consumed the world’s attention during these early months of 2020. The virus’ health threat, especially to older people and other vulnerable groups, is correctly the primary concern right now, with the pandemic’s economic consequences perhaps being the second greatest concern. Both these aspects of the pandemic fully deserve…


“Remember Pearl Harbor—Keep ‘Em Dying”: War and Racism in the Pacific

by John Whitehead American planes dropped firebombs on Tokyo 75 years ago, on the night of March 9-10, 1945, killing an estimated 80,000-100,000 people. The firebombing began a six-month-long American bombing campaign against 66 Japanese cities that culminated in the two atomic bombings and killed roughly 400,000 people in total. This killing campaign was the…


In Defense of “Yes, But” Rhetoric: The Case of the Suleimani Assassination

by John Whitehead The U.S. government’s assassination of Iranian General Qasem Suleimani began the year 2020 with violence, and the possibility of more violence. The assassination, in retaliation for Suleimani’s alleged involvement in attacks on U.S. personnel in Iraq (and supposedly to prevent further attacks), threatened to escalate into open war between the United States…


Fifty Years of Protesting for Peace

by Lisa Stiller Fifty years ago I was running from tear gas on the university campus in Madison, Wisconsin. Massive protests had erupted opposing the Vietnam War. Classes were often canceled as students clashed with police and the National Guard during the two years I attended school there. I was right out front, making protest…


Abortion and War: Breaking through the Euphemism Barrier

by Sarah Field Have you ever noticed the similarities between pro-abortion and pro-war arguments? It seems that whenever we want to justify killing people, we just automatically adopt similar conversational rules in order to maintain a veneer of respectability. Of course, it’s important to be clear that one is not supporting killing in general. For…


On Praying for the Military

The following is a letter CLN board member Julia Smucker addressed to her church at the request of one of her pastors after raising these concerns in person. As a nonsectarian organization, we welcome perspectives from various faiths, as well as secular ones, that affirm consistent-life principles.     Since attending my current church, I…


Peace & Life Referendums

by Rachel MacNair For updated information starting January 6, 2020, see this constantly-updated website: Peace and Life Referendums The original post was published September 3, 2019, and revisions were added until January 6, when the website took over the function   A reminder: The Consistent Life Network doesn’t necessarily endorse everything said in its blog,…